"The drb sustains a level of commentary on Irish and international matters that no other journal in Ireland and few elsewhere can reach. It deserves all the support that can be given it." X
Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

Monkey Business

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu met the divil on the bus. Very freaky.
More

Le Fanu's dark imagination

Less well known, but probably a better writer than Bram Stoker, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu was born two hundred years ago today.
More

More gin for the editor please

William Maginn, who died 170 years ago today, was a child prodigy from Cork who became a brilliant newspaper editor in London. But sadly, the drink got to him.
More

The birth of Irish democracy

Did Irish democracy develop in the 1920s in the early years of the new state or were it seeds sown a long time before?
More

Home is a sad place

With his fortieth birthday the realisation came to Philip Larkin that he had done nothing with the `fat fillet-steak' part of life.
More

The sentences in my head

László Krasnahorkai talks to George Szirtes about how he writes and what he reads.
More

Why they went to war

Why did the soldiers join up and go to be slaughtered in France, Belgium or Gallipoli? Sometimes because the misery of their lives made them think that anything would be better.
More

Forty days of sunshine

The Book of Kells will be joined by some other outstanding Irish manuscripts on display in Trinity College Dublin in 2016.
More

A bookselling institution

The famous Foyle's bookshop in central London is moving to a spectacularly beautiful new premises just down the road from its traditional Charing Cross Road pitch.
More

Cruel, cruel Margaret Stackpoole

James Clarence Mangan, a lad from the Liberties, went courting a posh girl up in Ranelagh. At first things seemed to be going well ...
More

If you gotta go ...

Former French prime minister Michel Rocard, in a resounding 'J'accuse!', tells the British that if they want to leave the EU they should just do that, and quickly too. Really, they've done quite enough damage inside.
More

Sumer is icumen in - or not

A new book celebrates the seasons. But tell me again, how many of them are there?
More

Adventures in Egypt

An episode from the early 1880s shows a young Augusta Gregory sympathising with an oppressed people and its revolutionary leaders - far from Ireland.
More

Ireland's Huguenots

Ireland's Huguenot community - originally Calvinist refugees from persecution in France, produced many notable Irishmen, including Tom Lefroy, the man Jane Austen had hoped to marry, and the Gothic novelist Charles Maturin, author of Melmoth the Wanderer.
More

Penguin relaunches Pelican

A hugely successful experiment in popular intellectual publishing, established in the 1930s and abandoned at the end of the Thatcherite 1980s, is being relaunched.
More

The Peasant Poet

John Clare, the Northamptonshire peasant poet who died 150 years ago, is not getting the commemoration he deserves in Britain.
More

Pater Improvidus

The life courses of two great Dublin writers of the nineteenth century, both born into the city's grocery trade, show the vastly differing outcomes that the quality of parental care may lay out for children.
More

The Inspector Returns

Penguin books has embarked on a programme to republish all 75 of George Simenon's Maigret novels. Will the phlegmatic Parisian policeman captivate a new generation?
More

Ten years since the big bang

In May 2004 ten new members, including eight from central and eastern Europe, joined the European Union. Have the effects of this major expansion on the union's capacity to define what it is been entirely positive?
More

A Perfect Idyll

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, whose bicentenary occurs this year, spent much of his childhood in the idyllic setting of the Phoenix Park, where his father was rector of the military school.
More