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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    A Life of Noticing

    Gerald Dawe
    The mastery of American English which we associate with Richard Ford’s fiction – the subtle not-saying, the deflection of painful emotional realities into half-said or half-seen things – is abundantly present in a memoir in which he recalls and recreates the lives of his parents.
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    The Virtual Republic

    Gerald Dawe
    John Hewitt was uncomfortable with the Northern state and frustrated by his inability to make contact with ‘his own people’. His verse is inflected with a growing consciousness of the damage done by the political exploitation of division and by a nostalgia for a different past.
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    Some Northern Poets

    Gerald Dawe
    The lives of the Catholic nationalist community in the North, but also its wider migrations and fate in the fledgling new Irish Free State and in Britain, North America and further afield is a fascinating history of adaptation and adoption as much as restlessness and disaffection.
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    A Fierce Eye

    Gerald Dawe
    At the heart of Derek Mahon’s new prose collection there is a lot of truth-telling going on about the artist’s life. It is a far cry from the showy, silly lifestyle version we are offered daily from media-hungry celebs, asking the reader to feel their pain.
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    Good Remembering

    Gerald Dawe interviewed by Andrea Rea
    Five questions for Gerald Dawe from US radio journalist and presenter Andrea Dawe on the occasion of the publication of his collection Mickey Finn’s Air cover composition and selection, memories of Galway and the difference between nostalgia and sentimentality.
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    New Poems

    Gerald Dawe
    These four new poems by Gerald Dawe are from Mickey Finn’s Air, to be published later this year by Gallery Press
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    Plunkett’s City

    Gerald Dawe
    Walks through Dublin’s streets and slums, and through the leafy avenues of the airy and salubrious suburb of Kingstown, punctuate James Plunkett’s Strumpet City, casting light on the social divisions of the city and the political tensions which, as the book opens in 1907, are just beginning to bubble up.
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    Ulster Polyphony

    Gerald Dawe
    Northern literature and culture, if it was seen to exist at all before the 1960s renaissance, tended to be blackened by a caricatural view of the wider culture, seen as ‘dour’. John Hewitt’s memoir of the 30s and 40s, however, shows that there were many and varied voices at work.
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    The Listener

    Gerald Dawe
    The Listener
    The gifts that those who knew him would expect to encounter, intelligence, wit and playfulness, are in ample evidence in Dennis O’Driscoll’s posthumous prose collection, as is his conviction of the central importance of poetry and what it can do.
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    Outlasting Fashion

    Gerald Dawe
    Outlasting Fashion
    The notions of rule and order that Richard Murphy inherited from his colonial administrator father have been put to different use by him in fashioning a body of poetic work that will endure.
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    Birds, beasts and flowers

    Gerald Dawe
    DH Lawrence’s poetry offers a record of the powerful current of physical pleasure, the elusive joy of witnessing that which is different, and the kind of opinionated prickliness when things are not what they seem to be or should be.
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    Interrupted Lives

    Gerald Dawe
    Fate dealt harshly with both JG Farrell and Stewart Parker, two hugely gifted Irish writers who died in their forties

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    LITERATURE IS ALWAYS NOW

    Gerald Dawe

    The idea of retreat or retrenchment might surprise those who see nothing but good in the present, with its ceaselessly productive creative arts, but Derek Mahon wants nothing to do with this cheerful complacency.
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