Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    No Sweat

    Michael Hinds
    James Joyce and Walter Benjamin worked hard over decades to evolve idiosyncratic methods apt for the city-text they wanted to communicate. But Kenneth Goldsmith’s montage version of New York comes from a culture that no longer attaches value to work, only to product.
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    Wee Book, Big Muscles

    Michael Hinds
    Don Paterson should be recognised as a poet who offers us strenuousness and sweetness in a way that nobody has since John Donne; he kills his enemies and loves his friends, making us vibrantly aware of poetry’s capabilities as an affectionate medium.
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    Mister Perfect

    Michael Hinds
    The frequently quoted descriptions of Michael Donaghy as a modern metaphysical may make prospective readers nervous; yet in the main there is nothing ostentatiously intellectual about his work. Rather, the abiding impression is that a poem is a minor fuss worth making.
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    The Big Cabbage

    Michael Hinds
    The Big Cabbage
    In the original Chandler novels, mansions, money and manicured lawns did not necessarily presage either virtue or happiness. In Black-Banville’s remake we seem to have taken cognisance of what has happened in the interim, with a Philip Marlowe who strangely equates sports cars and ‘money to burn’ with ‘class’.
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    The Sexual Caterwaul

    Michael Hinds
    It is difficult, in a permissive society, to define what is obscene. But to find at least something obscene shows that you are a sentient person.
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    Genius For Erasure

    Michael Hinds
    Cary Grant’s raised eyebrows were admittedly an awesome spectacle, but you wonder how they might have been harnessed to hasten the building of the Hoover Dam. At least in the 1930s they had Cary Grant. We have Lady Gaga.
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