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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

A Sabbath Stroll

A stroll down Thomas Street on a Sunday morning after divine service afforded the pious the pleasure of seeing the Dublin poor in thrall to ardent spirits and women, in their hoarse, degraded voices, singing to the praise of whiskey.
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Parnell, Redmond, Joyce and Griffith

James Joyce, an admirer of Arthur Griffith, thought the Irish Parliamentary Party was bankrupt. The Irish had destroyed Parnell, and now their main political party were mere tools of John Bull.
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Standing Up for the City

In 1843 an elderly member of Dublin Corporation reminded his colleagues of the mercantile wealth that the city enjoyed in the decades before the Act of Union.
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Industry out, tenements in

Tom Kelly, a Dublin alderman, in 1909 lamented the huge change that had come over Dublin's Liberties since the passing of the Act of Union.
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German tourist saves boy from certain death

Gallant visitor also commends 'serenely beautiful' scenery and grace and generosity of natives
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Where did the Protestants go?

There are many theories about the gradual decline of the Protestant community in Ireland. Some of them draw on clear evidence.
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The Workmans Friend

When money's tight and hard to get and your horse has also ran, when all you have is a heap of debt ...
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Knocking Dublin

A period of panic in the 1960s following the collapse of some tenement buildings led to a process that saw the destruction of much of Dublin's architectural heritage.
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What had Gretta on?

The Conroys and the Blooms had something in common: a stranger, in one case a dead one, had wandered into their marriage. They also tended to wander into each other's books.
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Amor and Psyche

A German traveller’s account of a visit he made to Dublin in 1850 reveals much about the politics and economics of being pretty and the life of a poor girl in Victorian Dublin
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Tallaght, before Babel

Fionn Mac Cumhaill was well remembered until quite recently for his many exploits not too far off the route of the 65b from Hawkins Street.
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The Prussians are impressed

The German historian Friedrich Von Raumer, visiting in 1835, had never seen beggars, or popular amusements, quite like Dublin's.
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A Dublin Poem

A no-man's land twixt Norse and Brit, chained to the granite quays.
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Hormones Will Out

Trinity College students in the early twentieth century were denied association with women, so their energies found other outlets.
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Morning Glory Beyond Rathmines

A Dublin poem, of going and returning, from Gerard Smyth.
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Weeping for the Workers

The supreme place given to the national question meant some Dublin politicians had to affect a deep concern for the poor they did not necessarily really feel.
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The Lady in the Dodder

A stroll along the banks of the Dodder recalls a murder committed in 1900, and its reverberations in two of Joyce's works.
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Well Done Please

Like the famous literary character he created, Bram Stoker was a healthy feeder.
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Supping with the Devil

Four generations ago Dublin had a vibrant and numerous working class Protestant community. For some of their middle class co-religionists they were too vibrant.
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Larkin in Dublin

Philip Larkin visited Dublin for a library conference in 1967. He wasn't hugely impressed.
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