Summer 2014

    Summer 2014
    The editors of the drb, who are on a short break, hope everyone is enjoying the summer. The next issue will be at the beginning of September. There will be an expanded New Books section and fourteen review essays on subjects including Terry Eagleton's opinion on the strength of religious appeal over that of competing systems in the post enlightenment world, the greatest famine ever in communist China, the life of John Burnside, the Catholic elite in Ireland and other topics.
    More

    The Restoration Drama

    John Feehan
    The Restoration Drama
    Nature is beyond our control, and lost ecosystems cannot be fully recovered. Yet our own survival depends on how we deal with questions of environmental conservation and restoration – and there are reasons for optimism, despite the reality of climate change and the scale of the problem.
    More

    One City, Many Voices

    Lucy Collins
    One City, Many Voices
    A new collection confines itself to poems about the city of Dublin but does not lack breadth or variety, spanning the centuries, including outsider as well as insider perspectives, and placing the old in dialogue with the new.
    More

    The Rich Man in his Castle

    Sean Byrne
    The Rich Man in his Castle
     Few now believe that the positions of the high and the lowly are ordained by God, but the increasingly entrenched political defenders of the super-rich still maintain that massive inequality is in the nature of things and must at all costs be preserved. As Gore Vidal said and Thomas Piketty’s study confirms, it’s not enough to succeed - others must fail.
    More

    Complications

    Seamus O’Mahony
    Surgery, and perhaps particularly neurosurgery, can be profoundly rewarding. But there is always the possibility of mistakes, those little slips that can lead to disaster and another headstone in the cemetery that all surgeons carry around with them.
    More

    A Month in the Summer

    Dermot Meleady
    In the midsummer of 1914, Ireland’s nationalist and unionist communities were on a collision course over developments affecting the future government of Ireland. Just as the crisis was about to materialise in violence, it was averted – for the moment – by a larger conflict.
    More

    Out on the Edge

    Terry Barry
    The people known as the Normans flourished in many parts of Europe in the early centuries of the second millennium AD. Their castles and fortifications are found as far west as Ireland, as far south as southern Italy and Sicily and as far east as Antioch.
    More

    Joyce’s Comic Strips

    Keith Payne
    A well-drawn portrait of our greatest artist that recounts some of the adventures of his life and work might be just the thing to perk up the days and weeks beyond Bloomsday, when, as like as not, rain could well again be general over Ireland.
    More

    The Modernist Moment

    Tom Hennigan
    Brazil, in the mid-twentieth century, saw a spectacular flourishing of architecture and town planning, associated with names like Niemeyer and Costa. But since then chaos and venality have returned, with builders rather than architects in the driving seat and recent hopes that the World Cup could be a game-changer disappointed.
    More

    The People’s Music

    Jeremy Kearney
    The British folk music scene began to thrive through its extensive club circuit in the 1950s and gave a platform to many Irish singers. It was seldom without tension, however, between purists like Ewan MacColl and others who put greater stress on enjoyment.
    More

Categories