A Time In Between

    Éadaoín Lynch
    A Time In Between
    The writers of the 1940s were paralysed by the sense that those who had gone before them and experienced the Great War had said everything there was to say about war and the pity of war.
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    Down Under

    George O’Brien
    Down Under
    Peter Carey’s Ned Kelly is Irish not in a straightforward or obvious way but is rather a metonymy for the citizen-outlier, the alternative history, the exemplary failure, the heroic victim, the road that is not just not travelled but is not on the map.
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    Beyond Belief

    Tom Hennigan
    Beyond Belief
    Gabriel García Márquez emerged explosively as a new international name in the 1960s with a novel stuffed with the baroque and the fantastic, which sought to translate the scope of America.
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    What’s funny?

    Máirtín Coilféir
    There have been many attempts to define the essence of humour but it seems to be a little too complex and wide-ranging to be captured by any single theory.
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    Selective Memories

    Martin Maguire
    Selective Memories
    In the business of commemoration tensions are to be expected between the practices of the academy, the demands of the state and the expectations of individuals and groups on how each and every significant date is marked, or not marked.
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    Varieties of Modernity

    Paul Gillespie
    Relations between capitalism and the state have been crucial in Europe. Both, accommodating to claim-making from civil society, gave this model a distinctive concern with social solidarity.
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    The Curator of Chiaroscuro

    Sean Sheehan
    Sebastião Salgado’s latest book of photographs represents nature more as a New Age dream of harmony rather than the random mayhem and violent contingency it actually is.
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    The Stilled World

    Nicola Gordon Bowe
    Unsentimental, sparing and unspecific, the painter Patrick Pye has sought figurative images to represent symbolically “the archetypes of our humanity” depicted in an alternative universe where expiation has been achieved.
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    Birds, beasts and flowers

    Gerald Dawe
    DH Lawrence’s poetry offers a record of the powerful current of physical pleasure, the elusive joy of witnessing that which is different, and the kind of opinionated prickliness when things are not what they seem to be or should be.
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    The Meaning of Ryanair

    Michael Cronin
    Orwell got it wrong. It is not governments but banks, insurance companies, pension funds and low-cost airlines, the raucous cheerleaders of deregulation, that oppress and stupefy us with a network of small and baffling rules.
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