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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Licking Death

    Seamus O’Mahony
    Licking Death
    Cancer is a serious business, and also big business, particularly in the US. But ‘declaring war’ on it is like declaring war on death. Our own Irish Cancer Society has launched a ‘strategy statement’ that envisages a ‘future without cancer’, but it modestly concedes that ‘this may not be achieved in the lifetime of this strategy statement’.
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    Doesn’t Add Up

    Shane Whelan
    Modern states are awash with statistics. So it doesn’t take too long, for example, to work out that inequalities of wealth are at their greatest since the late nineteenth century.
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    Getting to Grey

    Liam Hennessy
    Bipolar disorder has been explained as an attempt to create a world in which everything is either black or white. The illness can only be treated, it is suggested, when the important third element is introduced.
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    The Gentleman Naturalist

    David Askew
    Charles Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution have weathered well and he cannot be held responsible for those who have developed a repugnant politics on the back of a vulgarisation of them.
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    Clash of the Titans

    Thomas Boylan
    The pragmatism associated with JM Keynes derives from a sustained optimism in the capacity of intelligence to inform and influence correct responses to a crisis. Hayek’s market morality reflects an altogether more pessimistic view of human behaviour.
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    THINKING SHORT

    John Bradley
    A fixation on short term gain led to our economic collapse. Now it's time to focus on the real economy, where the fundamentals are still sound.
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    Angel of the North

    Éamon Ó Cléirigh
    In the 1970s, the young Christopher Robbins was admitted into the world of octogenarian film producer Brian Desmond Hurst, an unusual place, made up of eccentric neighbours, theatre folk, young men of religious convictions, aristocrats, policemen, blackmailers, sly procurers, feral rent boys and assorted waifs and strays.
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