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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Wordplay

    Declan O’Driscoll
    It’s not easy being in a Joanna Walsh story. Nothing is quite as it should be and however fervently you maintain hope, that vision you have of how life might approach perfection ‑ the image imagined ‑ never settles or sharpens into focus.
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    Love Persists, Despite

    Nessa O’Mahony
    Two new collections deal with the many challenges that life throws at us, from illness and ageing to bereavement, fragility and, eventually, death. And in spite of all this, the poet is compelled, as Kavanagh wrote, to ‘record love’s mystery without claptrap’.
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    Places Like Home

    Catherine Phil McCarthy
    Poet Gerard Smyth and painter Seán McSweeney have produced a remarkable collaboration of words and images built around the farms, fields and landscapes of Co Meath, where each of them spent some time in childhood
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    Mother of Invention

    Mary Morrissy
    Éilís Ní Dhuibne is a deceptive writer, deceptively light in tone, deceptively erudite in her references, deceptively irreverent in her treatment of form. Her literariness betrays itself when she pulls the narrative rug from under the reader and in her likeness for embroideries and yarns.
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    Making Waves

    Patricia Craig
    A novel set on Rathlin Island at the end of the nineteenth century takes as its subject the arrival of Marconi’s men to conduct an experiment transmitting sound across the sea. It derives its considerable force from the conjunction of archaism and modernity, the clash of material and immaterial forces.
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    Hauntings

    Peter Sirr
    Mark Granier’s poems are full of skies and hauntings, the missing, the dead, time’s erasures, ‘the slow shift of light’, the closely observing eye lighting on the city and where the city meets light and water and sky. He is, as one poem has it, an eternal ‘cloud watcher, seawatcher’.
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    Reasonable Doubt

    Frank Callanan
    Reasonable Doubt
    A study of Joyce’s literary use of the law by the late Adrian Hardiman stresses the writer’s ‘persistent assertion of the need for philosophical and judicial doubt as a proper, moral and humane reaction to the inadequacy of evidence’.
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    Those Who Remain

    Julia O’Mahony
    The new collection from Katie Donovan presents an unflinching look at the realities of living with and caring for a husband with a terminal illness while also acknowledging the chance fragments of joy she experiences as she continues to raise her young family.
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    A Soul in Wonder

    Sean O’Hogain
    As a poet, Michael Longley has so many sides to him that he is, for all practical purposes, round. His lyrical gift is wedded to a lightly worn but well-used education, an eye for detail and an ear for music.
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    The Virags and the Blooms

    Martin Greene
    Ulysses may have no story, but it does contain a multitude of little ones. Though artfully assembled, these can also be difficult to follow because the information provided is often incomplete, widely dispersed, presented out of sequence or hidden in obscure passages of text.
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