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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    The People’s Parties

    Brendan Sweeney
    If Sweden and Ireland are ever compared, it is almost always to the detriment of the latter and many on the left entertain the notion that we would be a lot better off if we could be more like the Nordics. Yet there are curious similarities between the dominant parties that have been in power for most of the modern history of both countries.
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    Liberal, but to a Degree

    Ultán Gillen
    Neoconservatives have argued that liberty and democracy tend not to exist in the absence of markets and free enterprise, and that they in turn are dependent on a vigorous middle class. But the middle class has not been, everywhere and in all circumstances, unambiguously wedded to democracy.
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    All in the Mix

    Michael Cronin
    All in the Mix
    Inspired by atomistic science, thinkers in early modern England, including John Locke, developed a conceptual framework whereby it is the mixture of parts, unregulated by any superior form, which constitutes both the natural world and the body politic.
    Wolfram Schmidgen explores this school of thought which challenged the dominant, Aristotelian world view in the early days of modernity.

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    Democracy’s Sphinx

    Andreas Hess
    Democracy’s Sphinx
    A new study of Alexis de Tocqueville emphasises his French intellectual background and makes the case that his classic analysis of American democracy may be understood as well, or even better, if it is considered primarily in terms of the old European society for which it was written.
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    Beastly to the Hun

    William Mulligan
    Beastly to the Hun
    A new study of the origins of the First World War provides an engaging and skilful account but is perhaps a little too close to the perceptions of the victors and a little too ready to see only malice emanating from Berlin.
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    There will be blood

    Hugh Gough
    There will be blood
    More than any other single figure, Maximilien Robespierre is identified with, and blamed for, the terror and bloodshed of France’s revolutionary years, yet the hostility of contemporaries, historians and political commentators is not wholly justified.
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    Dying for Dixie

    Enrico Dal Lago
    A new study examines the case of the Irish immigrants who found themselves in the southern states at the time of the American Civil War and who circumstances dictated would declare for the Confederacy.
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    Crimes and Punishment

    David Blake Knox
    Crimes and Punishment
    Germans have confronted the crimes of the Nazi regime with honesty and thoroughness. Important sections of Japanese society, however, prefer to forget or forgive the wartime actions of their army and deal with victim nations with defiance, not conciliation.
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    John Bull Knows Best

    Niall Gillespie
    John Bull Knows Best
    A new biography of British liberal imperialist Thomas Macaulay, who made his mark on India as a young man, does not challenge the view that the liberalism he espoused was often only skin deep while the imperialism was all too real and damaging to those on the receiving end.
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    Total War

    Liam Hennessy
    In the brutal conduct of its invasion of the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany revealed its true nature fully for the first time as all political, legal or moral scruples were cast aside.
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