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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Love Me Why Don’t You?

    Jon Smith
    Love Me Why Don’t You?
    Donald Trump may appear to thrive on antagonism – and indeed he has no trouble finding it – but he is also a man who is desperate for approbation. A populist with a totalitarian mindset, he is that strangest of creatures – a political confidence man with no confidence.
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    Making Russia Great Again

    Pádraig Murphy
    Making Russia Great Again
    Vladimir Putin has made it clear that he plans to operate through an authoritarian state at home, while abroad he wishes Russia to be felt as a great power again, even if that means ‘breaking the American monopoly on the breaking of international law’.
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    Return of the Nativist

    Bryan Fanning
    The new nativism claims to be based on common-sense solidarity with fellow citizens. It differs from white nationalism and seems almost to wish to promote a kind of cohesion among Britain’s current ethnically diverse population by uniting it against new immigrants. 
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    Defending Freedom

    John Swift
    Contemporary critics of the human rights tradition argue either that it is a racket for the benefit of lawyers or that it is based on impractical idealism. But we should not forget what a dictatorship looks like; to fight for civilised decency is still important, and success is not impossible.
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    The New Law of War

    Gerry Kearns
    The US military presents the Middle East as permanently unstable, ignoring its own continual interventions in the region and portraying it rather as an external place from which the United States is repeatedly threatened and to which it is periodically required to return.
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    Literarily Hitler

    Paul O’Mahoney
    Literarily Hitler
    The politicisation of everyday life is most typical of totalitarian regimes but every society in every age is susceptible. To politicise life is not to elevate it but to reduce it to one dimension and vulgarise it, sharpening partisanship and inducing people to lower their intellectual standards.
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    Part of What They Are

    Maurice Earls
    Driven by its history, Britain is hurtling towards a hard Brexit, which is likely to be a quite unpleasant experience for our neighbours, and perhaps to some degree also for us. Unless, that is, a coalition of pragmatists emerges in Westminster. In that eventuality perhaps Ireland should offer a helping hand.
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    The View from the Veranda

    Eoin Dillon
    Africa may be said to have two public spheres. In the air-conditioned office visiting officials from the World Bank or the IMF conduct their business. But the veranda is where most Africans do business, transact politics and live their lives. The elite is comfortable in both spaces.
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    Beyond Anger

    John Fanning
    If the centre-left is to regain some influence in politics it will have to become more interesting. Accepted wisdom on becoming more interesting these days seems to revolve around finding the right “personality”. But let us not forget the importance of policies and ideas.
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    In Love With Death

    Eugene Brennan
    Is Islam a violent or a peaceful religion? Rather than cherrypicking the sacred texts, we might be better served by sociology and reception studies: rather than trying to decipher what the Quran says, that is, one might usefully listen to what Muslims think and say it says.
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