New Books: Information & Extracts

    The Rise and Fall of Ireland’s Celtic Tiger

    Seán Ó Riain
    In 2008 Ireland experienced one of the most dramatic economic crises of any economy in the world. It remains at the heart of the international crisis, sitting uneasily between  the US and European economies.
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    Listening to Bach

    Pearse Hutchinson
    A posthumous collection of Pearse Hutchinson’s poems has just been published. His poems have long been recognized as unique, for their lively, learned, humane framing of experience, and for their urgent and communicative language. They are redolent of his personality: of a life lived wide awake and in many places, of a mind adventurous and well equipped that engaged above all with the truth of things as they happen.
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    The Temporary Gentleman

    Sebastian Barry
    Jack McNulty is a ‘temporary gentleman’, an Irishman whose commission in the Second World War was never permanent. In 1957, sitting in his lodgings in Accra, he urgently sets out to write his story.
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    The Appleman and the Poet

    Hubert Butler
    Russia features prominently in the fifth volume of Hubert Butler’s essays. Beginning with ‘Russian Dispatches 1932-1946’, Butler gives an evocative description – from the viewpoint of a bourgeois teacher – of a society in dissolution, before the onset of Stalin’s Great Purge.
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    The Lost Spirit of Capitalism

    Bernard Stiegler
    In this important book, Bernard Stiegler takes a very different view: what we are witnessing today he says is not the triumph of the spirit of capitalism but rather its demise, as our contemporary ‘hyperindustrial’ societies become increasingly uncontrollable, irrational and incapable of inspiring hope.
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    The Leaves on Grey

    Desmond Hogan
    Desmond Hogan’s 1980 novel has been reissued. The Leaves on Grey is the story of Ireland, ’maker of wounds, tormentor of youth, ultimately breaker of all that was sensitive and enriched by sun, rain, wind’. Sean and Liam, and the men and women who become part of their lives, are both the creators and the victims of their birthright.
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    The Rise and Fall of Al-Qaeda

    Fawaz A. Gerges
    According to the author of this book the war with Al-Qaeda is over. The once fearsome and deeply feared organization has degenerated into a marginal entity, kept alive largely by the massive self serving anti- terrorist bureaucracy it helped spawn in Washington and elsewhere.
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    Eating Fire, My Life as a Lesbian Avenger

    Kelly Cogswell
    Described as a freewheeling memoir of lesbian activism - alternately funny and raucous, meditative and reflective – it is a document of a specific time and place. But it is also a marvelous, timeless tale of wit, survival, determination, and, ultimately, of facing history. Incisive, politically astute, and a much needed addition to LGBT history
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    Thinking Big, How the Evolution of Social Life Shaped the Human Mind

    Clive Gamble, John Gowlett and Robin Dunbar
    In this book the authors ask when and how did the brains of our homonin ancestors become human minds? When and why did our capacity for language or art, music and dance evolve? It is the contention of this pathbreaking and provocative book that it was the need for early humans to live in ever- larger social groups.
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    The Flea Market in Valparaiso

    Gabriel Rosenstock
    According to one commentator “Gabriel Rosenstock’s poetry is unique in the aesthetic resolution it achieves between the political and the metaphysical, the regional and the universal, the identification with the victims of injustice, neglect and exploitation and the celebration of nature’s endless mystery: there are very few poets writing today who can equal him in his range.”
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    Are We all Scientific Experts Now?

    Collins, Harry
    In this provocative new book Harry Collins seeks to redeem scientific expertise, and reasserts sceience’s special status. Despite the messy realities of day-to-day scientific endeavour, he emphasises the superior moral qualities of science, dismissing the dubious “default” expertise displayed by many of those outside the scientific community.
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    Horace and Me

    Eyres, Harry
    In Horace and Me, Eyres re-examines Horace’s life, legacy and verse. With a light, lyrical touch and a keen critical eye, Eyres reveals a lively, relevant Horace, whose society – Rome at the dawn of the empire – has much in common with our own, including a curious sense of hollowness at the heart of unparalleled prosperity.
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    Does Capitalism have a Future?

    Wallterstein, Collins, Mann, Derluguian and Calhoun.
    In Does Capitalism have a future, a global quintet of distinguished scholars cut their way through to the question of whether our capitalist system can survive in the medium run. Despite the current gloom, conventional wisdom still assumes that there is no real alternative to capitalism. The authors argue that this generalization is a mistaken outgrowth of the optimistic nineteenth-century claim that human history ascends through stages to an enlightened equilibrium of liberal capitalism.
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    Dictionary of Untranslatables

    Cassin, B (ed)
    This is an encyclopedic dictionary of close to 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms and concepts that defy easy – or any – translation from one language and culture to another. The entries, written by more than 150 distinguished scholars, describe the origins and meanings of each term, the history and context of its usage, its translations into other languages, and its use in notable texts. 
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    Aspects of Irish Aristocratic Life

    Cosgrove, Dooley , Mullaney-Dignam, (eds)
    This collection of essays, by established and emerging scholars, draws together some of the most recent and specialised research on the FitzGerlads, providing original perspectives on various aspects of their aristocratic history.
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    The Myth of Manliness in Irish National Culture, 1880 – 1922

    Valente, Joseph
    This study supplies the first contextually precise account of the male gender anxieties and ambivalences haunting the culture of Irish nationalism in the era preceding the Irish Free State. 

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    The Books that Define Ireland

    Bryan Fanning, Tom Garvin
     This engaging and provocative work consists of 29 chapters and discusses over 50 mostly non-fiction books that capture the development of Irish social and political thought since the early seventeenth century. 
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    The Silence of Animals

    John Gray
    Why do humans seek meaning to life? How do our imaginations leap into worlds so far beyond our actual reality? In this work, John Gray explores how we decorate our existence with countless fictions, twisting and turning to avoid acknowledging that we too are animal.
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    Two Sisters Singing

    Carmen Cullen

    Surrounded by the beauty of her native Mayo, eighteen-year-old Lily dreams of being a famous singer on the London stage – but her parents have planned a more normal life for her, taking a degree in UCD. But leaving home also means leaving a passionate romance with a handsome visiting American named Theo. Carmen Cullen delivers a convincing portrayal of both the warmth and the wrath of 1940s Ireland.




    Surrounded by the beauty of her native Mayo, eighteen-year-old Lily dreams of being a famous singer on the London stage – but her parents have planned a more normal life for her, taking a degree in UCD. But leaving home also means leaving a passionate romance with a handsome, visiting American named Theo. Carmen Cullen delivers a convincing portrayal of both the warmth and the wrath of 1940s’ Ireland.

     

    Surrounded by the beauty of her native Mayo, eighteen-year-old Lily dreams of being a famous singer on the London stage – but her parents have planned a more normal life for her, taking a degree in UCD. But leaving home also means leaving a passionate romance with a handsome, visiting American named Theo. Carmen Cullen delivers a convincing portrayal of both the warmth and the wrath of 1940s’ Ireland.

     

    Surrounded by the beauty of her native Mayo, eighteen-year-old Lily dreams of being a famous singer on the London stage – but her parents have planned a more normal life for her, taking a degree in UCD. But leaving home also means leaving a passionate romance with a handsome, visiting American named Theo. Carmen Cullen delivers a convincing portrayal of both the warmth and the wrath of 1940s’ Ireland.

     

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    The Normans and Empire

    David Bates

    The book offers a new interpretative framework for the analysis of the history of the cross-channel polity created by William the Conqueror in 1066 until its end in 1204, when the Duchy of Normandy was conquered by the French king, Philip Augustus. As part of its argument, it also suggests an innovative way to approach the pan-European diaspora of the Normans.

     

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