Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Beyond the Centre

    Writers in their own Words
    To mark the 25th anniversary of the Irish Writers Centre, Beyond the Centre: Writers in their own Words is a landmark anthology of essays by some of Ireland’s foremost contemporary writers, specially commissioned and edited by Declan Meade, publisher of The Stinging Fly.
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    Jonathan Swift: The Reluctant Rebel

    John Stubbs
    John Stubbs' biography follows Swift through his many battles, for and against authority, and in his many contradictions, as a priest who sought to uphold the dogma of his church; as a man who was quite prepared to defy convention, not least in his unshakeable attachment to an unmarried woman, his 'Stella'; and as a writer whose vision showed that no single creed holds all of the answers.

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    Modern Ireland and Revolution

    Cormac O’Malley
    Leading Irish and American historians and academics deliver critical essays that consider the life, writings and monumental influence of Ernie O’Malley, and the modern arts that influenced him. In this collection, art and revolution coincide, enriching every preconception of the minds that supported both sides of the Treaty, and revealing untoward truths about the Irish Free State’s process of remembrance.
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    Harp Studies: Perspectives on the Irish Harp

    Sandra Joyce & Helen Lawlor
    Taking an expansive view of the harp through history and music, these essays individually engage with the variety of ways in which the harp has been interpreted and implicated in Irish culture, politics and music from the 9th century to the present day.
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    Frantumaglia

    Elena Ferrante

    A glimpse into the drawers of Elena Ferrante’s writing desk, those drawers from which emerged her three early standalone novels and the four installments of My Brilliant Friend, known in English as the Neapolitan Quartet. Consisting of over 20 years of letters, essays, reflections, and interviews, it is a unique depiction of an author who embodies a consummate passion for writing.

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    Writing the Sky: Observations and Essays on Dermot Healy

    Neil Murphy and Keith Hopper
    A comprehensive collection of critical essays, memoirs, poetry, and other writerly responses devoted to the life and work of the late Dermot Healy (1947– 2014). Healy was an accomplished poet, short story writer, novelist, playwright, and editor, and so these essays and observations address the entire range of his eclectic oeuvre.
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    A Single Headstrong Heart

    Kevin Myers

    Kevin Myers’ memoir, a prequel to Watching The Door, describes in a first-person narrative his childhood up to the early years of his career as a journalist and his departure from University College Dublin in the late 1960s.

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    Stereotypes, Ideology and Foreign Correspondents

    Fergal Lenehan

    An examination of German media representations of Ireland from 1946 to 2010, from the post-war period to the years of the Celtic Tiger and Ireland’s subsequent economic downturn.

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    You Took The Last Bus Home: The Poems of Brian Bilston

    Brian Bilston
    The first and long-awaited collection of hilarious and surprisingly touching poems from Brian Bilston, the mysterious ‘Poet Laureate of Twitter’.
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    The Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin

    Michael English
    A lavishly-illustrated book, the fourth in Dublin City Council’s series on engineering history and heritage, has been produced to mark the bi-centenary of the Ha'penny bridge, opened in 1816, the first dedicated footbridge over the river Liffey and the first iron bridge in Ireland.
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    Sway

    Peter Sirr
    Comprises poems from the troubadour tradition and a number of Peter Sirr's responses to them. With their source in southern France almost nine centuries ago, and in teh language called Old Occitan, this confluence of word and music helped pave the way for European poetry as we know it.
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    Marx's 'Capital' - Sixth Edition

    Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho
    This expert guide is the classic companion to Karl Marx’s most well-known work, Capital. In print now for over a quarter of a century, and translated into many languages, this new edition has been fully revised and updated, making it an ideal modern introduction to one of the most important texts in political and economic thought today.
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    Grave Matters

    Lisa Marie Griffith and Ciarán Wallace (eds)
    An examination of the universal subject of death – looking at the particular experience of death, burial and commemoration in Dublin since the sixteenth century. Using death as a way of understanding social conditions, contributions consider the role of the public funeral in establishing political hierarchies, the fate of the city’s Catholics during the era of the penal laws and the survival of the death penalty to 1990.
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    Four Sides Full

    Vona Groarke

    A personal essay by Vona Groarke, one of Ireland’s leading poets. Her seven collections to date have all displayed a fascination with the visual arts but Four Sides Full takes a different approach. In considering frames and what they bring to an artwork it reflects on themes of containment and exclusion, and how a life can flit between.

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    Above the Waterfall

    Ron Rash
    The story of Sheriff Les Clary. A man on the verge of retirement, he is plunged into deep and dangerous waters by one final case. A case that will draw him to the lyrical beauty of his surroundings and, in doing so, force him to come to terms with his own past.
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    The Sellout

    Paul Beatty
    Winner of the Man Booker Prize 2016, The Sellout is Paul Beatty's biting satire about a young man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court.
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    The Abode of Fancy

    Sam Coll

    The Abode of Fancy, debut novel of Irish writer Sam Coll, fuses reality and fantasy in an extraordinary narrative. In modern-day Dublin, Simeon, a melancholy student, is tormented by unrequited love, jealousy and loneliness. He seeks solace in the company of his father’s friends, a disparate group of world-weary alcoholics, and through them glimpses a grim picture of his own probable future life.

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    Geomantic

    Paula Meehan
    Comprising eighty-one poems of nine 9-syllable lines, Paula Meehan’s extraordinary new collection is both a controlled experiment with the challenge of form and, at once, a free-form meditation on the nature of memory, community, love and poetry itself.
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    Loose Canon: The Extraordinary Songs of Clive James and Pete Atkin

    Ian Shircore
    For the last 50 years, Clive James has been writing songs with his musical partner, Pete Atkin. This book explores the lyrics and tunes that have won them a fanatical cult following though they still manage to remain the British music industry’s best-kept secret.
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    I Read the News Today, Oh Boy

    Paul Howard
    Author Paul Howard has pieced together the extraordinary story of a young Irishman who epitomized the spirit of the times: one of Swinging London's most popular faces, he lived fast, died young and was immortalized for ever in the opening lines of 'A Day in the Life', a song that many critics still regard as The Beatles' finest. But who was John Lennon's lucky man who made the grade and then blew his mind out in a car?
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