Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    John Barth

    Gabrielle Dean and Charles B. Harris (eds)
    For the past half-century, John Barth has been recognised as our quintessential postmodernist and praised as one of the best writers “we have ever had” (New York Times Book Review). In this unique collection, thirty-six writers and critics look back at Barth’s career, providing a deeper understanding of his books as well as privileged glimpses into the man behind the books.
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    Guilty but Insane

    James W. Taylor
    A study of Captain J.C. Bowen-Colthurst, who having served with the British Army in the Boer War, in Tibet and in the Great War, returned to Ireland and was caught up in the 1916 rebellion when he was responsible for the deaths of six unarmed civilians, including the pacifist Francis Sheehy-Skeffington.
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    Ever Seen a Fat Fox?

    Mike Gibney
    Why it is that only humans - or animals in the care of humans - develop obesity? In Ever Seen a Fat Fox?: Human Obesity Explored Professor Mike Gibney delves into the history of the human relationship with food. He traces the evolution of our modern diet and looks to science to offer solutions to the phenomenon of human obesity.
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    The Dublin Civic Portrait Collection

    Mary Clark

    A catalogue of the entire portrait collection, beginning in the early 17th century and continuing to the present day, built up by the city of Dublin that is unique in Ireland in terms of range and diversity, and is brilliantly expressive of the political aspirations and realities that have informed its creation.

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    The Springs of Affection

    Maeve Brennan
    "Brennan is, for a new generation of Irish women writers, a casualty of old wars not yet won. The prose holds her revived reputation very well, especially the Irish stories" - from Anne Enright's introduction to this reissue from The Stinging Fly.
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    The politics of judicial selection in Ireland

    Jennifer Carroll MacNeill
    This book provides an unprecedented analysis of the politics underlying the appointment of judges in Ireland, enlivened by a wealth of interview material, and putting the Irish experience into a broad comparative framework.
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    Nothing On Earth

    Conor O'Callaghan
    A frightened girl bangs on a door. A man answers. From the moment he invites her in, his world will never be the same again. Poet Conor O'Callaghan's debut novel.
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    More than Concrete Blocks

    Ellen Rowley (ed)
    The first in a three-volume series of architectural history books which are richly illustrated and written for the general reader. Unpacking the history of Dublin’s architecture during the twentieth century, each book covers a period in chronological sequence: Volume I covers 1900–40.
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    Cold War Culture

    Jim Smyth
    Jim Smyth's book shows that, despite being allergic to McCarthy-style vulgarity, British intellectuals in the 1950s operated within powerful Cold War paradigms all the same
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    Between You and Me

    Mary Norris

    Mary Norris has spent more than three decades in The New Yorker's copy department, maintaining its celebrated high standards. Now she brings her vast experience to describe some of the most common and vexing problems in spelling, punctuation, and usage—comma faults, danglers, "who" vs. "whom," "that" vs. "which," compound words, gender-neutral language—and her clear explanations of how to handle them.

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    At Swim

    Brendan Mac Evilly with Michael O'Reilly

    Sea swimming is the great leveller; we’re all the same in a pair of togs. No one minds who you are or what you’ve done; the question is ‘are you getting in?’ Popular for centuries, sea swimming has had a recent surge in interest with a growing community taking the plunge.


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    All That Man Is

    David Szalay

    Nine men. Each of them at a different stage of life, each of them away from home, and each of them striving – in the suburbs of Prague, beside a Belgian motorway, in a cheap Cypriot hotel – to understand just what it means to be alive, here and now.

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    Who Rules the World?

    Noam Chomsky
    The culmination of years of work, Noam Chomsky's definitive intellectual investigation into America's pursuit and exercise of power in a post 9/11 world.

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    The Lonely Sea and Sky

    Dermot Bolger
    Part historical fiction, part extraordinary coming-of-age tale, the novel charts the maiden voyage of fourteen-year-old Jack Roche aboard a tiny Wexford ship, the Kerlogue, on a treacherous wartime journey to Portugal.
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    Roger Casement: The Black Diaries

    Jeffrey Dudgeon
    In this revised and expanded second edition with more photographs, all Roger Casement's Black Diaries are published together, including the 1911 Diary over which London threatened an obscenity prosecution.
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    Signatories

    The text of a unique theatre performance in which eight Irish writers remember the 1916 revolutionaries. A performance introduction on the staging of the play is given by Director Patrick Mason, and an introduction by Lucy Collins, School of English, Drama and Film, UCD, sets the historical context of the play.
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    Peadar Clancy

    Cormac O Comhrai and Stiofan O Comhrai
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    Granta 135: New Irish Writing

    A special issue showcasing contemporary Irish fiction, memoir, poetry and photography.
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    Chronicles

    Thomas Piketty

    With the same powerful evidence, and range of reference, as his global bestseller Capital in the Twenty-First Century - and in columns of 700 words, rather than 700 pages - Chronicles sets out Thomas Piketty's analysis of the financial crisis, what has happened since and where we should go from here.

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    A Short History of Medicine

    Erwin H. Ackerknecht
    A revised and expanded edition includes a new foreword and concluding biographical essay by Charles E. Rosenberg, Ackerknecht’s former student and a new bibliographic essay by Lisa Haushofer which explores recent scholarship in the history of medicine.
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