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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Cosmosapiens

    John Hands
    Specialist scientific fields are developing at incredibly swift speeds, but what can they really tell us about how the universe began and how we humans evolved to play such a dominant role on Earth? John Hands's extraordinarily ambitious quest is to bring together this scientific knowledge and evaluate without bias or preconception all the theories and evidence about the origin and evolution of matter, life, consciousness, and humankind. This astonishing book provides the most comprehensive account yet of current ideas such as cosmic inflation, dark energy, the selfish gene, and neurogenetic determinism. In the clearest possible prose it differentiates the firmly established from the speculative and examines the claims of various fields such as string theory to approach a unified theory of everything. In doing so it challenges the orthodox consensus in those branches of cosmology, biology, and neuroscience that have ossified into dogma. Its striking analysis reveals underlying patterns of cooperation, complexification, and convergence that lead to the unique emergence in humans of a self-reflective consciousness that enables us to determine our future evolution. This groundbreaking book is destined to become a classic of scientific thinking. - See more at: http://ducknet.co.uk/books/all/Cosmosapiens#sthash.YTodmeZ0.dpuf
    Specialist scientific fields are developing at incredibly swift speeds, but what can they really tell us about how the universe began and how we humans evolved to play such a dominant role on Earth? John Hands's extraordinarily ambitious quest is to bring together this scientific knowledge and evaluate without bias or preconception all the theories and evidence about the origin and evolution of matter, life, consciousness, and humankind. This astonishing book provides the most comprehensive account yet of current ideas such as cosmic inflation, dark energy, the selfish gene, and neurogenetic determinism. In the clearest possible prose it differentiates the firmly established from the speculative and examines the claims of various fields such as string theory to approach a unified theory of everything. In doing so it challenges the orthodox consensus in those branches of cosmology, biology, and neuroscience that have ossified into dogma. Its striking analysis reveals underlying patterns of cooperation, complexification, and convergence that lead to the unique emergence in humans of a self-reflective consciousness that enables us to determine our future evolution. This groundbreaking book is destined to become a classic of scientific thinking. - See more at: http://ducknet.co.uk/books/all/Cosmosapiens#sthash.YTodmeZ0.dpuf
    John Hands brings together scientific knowledge to evaluate without bias or preconception all the theories and evidence about the origin and evolution of matter, life, consciousness, and humankind. A comprehensive account of current ideas such as cosmic inflation, dark energy, the selfish gene, and neurogenetic determinism.
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    Islamic State

    Michael Griffin
    The story of the uprising against President Assad of Syria and his regime's varied responses; the human cost; the role played by Free Syrian Army, Islamist groups, Iran, Hezbollah and Russia; the chemical weapons attacks in 2013; and the House of Commons vote not to impose a no-fly zone over the country.
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    Surveillance After Snowden

    David Lyon
    Surveillance expert David Lyon guides the reader through Snowden’s ongoing disclosures: the technological shifts involved, the steady rise of invisible monitoring of innocent citizens, the collusion of government agencies and for-profit companies and the implications for how we conceive of privacy in a democratic society infused by the lure of big data.
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    Lacan on Love

    Bruce Fink
    Can psychoanalysis – with ample assistance from philosophers, poets, novelists, and songwriters – give us a new perspective on the wellsprings and course of love? This first-ever commentary on Lacan’s Seminar VIII, Transference, provides readers with a clear and systematic introduction to Lacan’s views on love.
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    Sugar

    Ben Richardson
    There is more sugar in the world's diet than ever before, but life is far from sweet for the exploited producers making nature's 'white gold' and the unhealthy consumers eating it. Ben Richardson examines why the billion-dollar sugar trade has created such inequities and argues that the answer to this question can be found in the dynamics of global capitalism.
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    The Planet Remade

    Oliver Morton
    This book explores the history, politics, and cutting-edge science of geoengineering, weighing both the promise and perils of these controversial strategies and putting them in the broadest possible context.
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    Francis Bacon in Your Blood

    Michael Peppiatt
    Michael Peppiatt met Francis Bacon in June 1963 when Bacon invited him to lunch, and over oysters and Chablis they began a friendship and a no-holds-barred conversation that would continue until Bacon's death thirty years later.

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    And Yet... Essays

    Christopher Hitchens
    A volume of Christopher Hitchens' previously unpublished essays, covering the themes that define Hitchens the thinker: literature, religion and politics.
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    The Seven Good Years

    Etgar Keret

    Over the last seven years Etgar Keret has had plenty of reasons to worry. His son, Lev, was born in the middle of a terrorist attack in Tel Aviv. His father became ill. And he has been constantly tormented by nightmarish visions of the Iranian president Ahmadinejad, anti-Semitic remarks both real and imagined, and, perhaps most worrisome of all, a dogged telemarketer who seems likely to chase him to the grave.

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    The Worst of Times

    Paul B. Wignall

    Two hundred and sixty million years ago, life on Earth suffered wave after wave of cataclysmic extinctions, with the worst—the end-Permian extinction—wiping out nearly every species on the planet. The Worst of Times delves into the mystery behind these extinctions and sheds light on the fateful role the primeval supercontinent, known as Pangea, may have played in causing these global catastrophes.

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    History's People

    Margaret MacMillan
    New from the author of The War that Ended Peace: vivid accounts of the men and women who shaped history.
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    In Praise of Forgetting

    David Rieff
    Ranging widely across some of the defining conflicts of modern times - the Irish Troubles and the Easter Uprising of 1916, the white settlement of Australia, the American Civil War, the Balkan wars, the Holocaust, and 9/11 - David Rieff presents an examination of the uses and abuses of historical memory.
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    Death Shall Be Dethroned

    Hélène Cixous
    The translation into English of another instalment of Hélène Cixous's ongoing reflection on the profound connection between writing and loss
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    The Metamorphosis of the World

    Ulrich Beck
    Much of the debate about climate change has focused on whether or not it is really happening, and if it is, what we can do to stop or contain it. But this emphasis on solutions blinds us to the fact that climate change is an agent of metamorphosis. It has already altered our way of being in the world the way we live in the world, think about the world and seek to act upon the world through our actions and politics.
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    Playing to the Gallery

    Grayson Perry

    Now Grayson Perry is a fully paid-up member of the art establishment, he wants to show that any of us can appreciate art (after all, there is a reason he's called this book Playing to the Gallery and not 'Sucking up to an Academic Elite').

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    ISIS: A History

    Fawaz A. Gerges
    An authoritative introduction to arguably the most important conflict in the world today, offering an exploration of the social turmoil and political violence ravaging the Arab-Islamic world.
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    Curiosity

    Alberto Manguel
    Alberto Manguel tracks his own life of curiosity through a selection of writers who sparked his imagination. He dedicates each chapter to a single thinker, scientist, artist, or other figure who demonstrated in a fresh way how to ask “Why?”
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    The Way We Die Now

    Seamus O'Mahony

    Seamus O'Mahoney's thoughtful, moving and unforgettable book on the western way of death. Dying has never been more public, with celebrities writing detailed memoirs of their illness, but in private we have done our best to banish all thought of dying and made a good death increasingly difficult to achieve.

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    A Short History of Medicine

    Erwin H. Ackerknecht
    A revised and expanded edition includes a new foreword and concluding biographical essay by Charles E. Rosenberg, Ackerknecht’s former student and a new bibliographic essay by Lisa Haushofer which explores recent scholarship in the history of medicine.
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    Between You and Me

    Mary Norris

    Mary Norris has spent more than three decades in The New Yorker's copy department, maintaining its celebrated high standards. Now she brings her vast experience to describe some of the most common and vexing problems in spelling, punctuation, and usage—comma faults, danglers, "who" vs. "whom," "that" vs. "which," compound words, gender-neutral language—and her clear explanations of how to handle them.

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